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How to See the Pope When in Rome

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Millions of people visit the Vatican every year in hopes of a chance to see the Pope.

This post provides details about how to see him, where he makes appearances, and when you should head to Vatican City for a chance to spot him.


Overview

There are a few different ways to see the Pope every week, and each opportunity is entirely free.

Anyone who wants to see the Pope should consider either a Wednesday or a Sunday visit to St. Peter’s Basilica.

On both days, visitors can attend an event that will allow them to see or at least listen to the Pope.

The pope waving to an audience. Image source: Pixabay user Annett Klingner.

While you will need a ticket for special Papal masses and audiences, those tickets are also free. Guests should expect large crowds on popular days.

If you’re going to visit the Vatican to see the Pope, you might also want to spend some time in the area seeing notable historic sites such as St. Peter’s Basilica and the Vatican Museums.

Even if you have the chance to see the Pope, you shouldn’t expect to get close to him.

There are often a lot of people in Vatican City on days when he makes an appearance, so you’re unlikely to be in the right place at the right time.

Another thing to keep in mind is that you shouldn’t attempt to reach out to him.

If he wants to shake hands he will, but please do not be pushy or arrive with any expectation other than the possibility of seeing the Pope.

If you are planning to visit St. Peter's or the Vatican Museums, keep in mind that they have a dress code you will need to follow and other security regulations to keep in mind.


Wednesday Papal Audience

A Papal Audience is held almost every Wednesday, giving travelers from around the globe a chance to listen to an address given by the Pope.

Although tickets are required, they are also given away for free by the Prefecture of the Papal Household.

All you need to do for a ticket is fill out a form and make a request. This form will need to be faxed back in order to receive tickets.

Papal Audiences start at 10-10:30 am and last for between 60-90 minutes on average. Arrive at least 2 hours early in order to get a good seat.

TIP: For €39, you could have instant tickets, which include a live tour guide on the morning of the event to explain to you the event, provide headphones (to hear the pope clearly), and to show you where to get a good spot.


Sunday Angelus

Unlike the Wednesday Papal Audience, you do not need a ticket for this event.

On Sundays at noon, the Pope will appear from the window of an apartment at St. Peter’s Square.

During this short 20-minute experience, he will provide a short speech followed by the Angelus and an Apostolic Blessing. 

If you want a good view, make sure to arrive early and get a good spot. This is one of the easiest options to see the Pope in Vatican City.


Papal Masses

If your heart is set on attending an actual Papal Mass, you’ll be happy to hear that tickets for these events are also free.

However, the schedule for Papal Masses tends to vary from month to month.

Due to the often unpredictable schedule, we recommend requesting tickets well ahead of time and potentially planning your entire trip around this one event.

Although most Papal Masses are held on regular days, there are also Holiday Masses which can be much more difficult to attend.

Ask for tickets at least 6 months in advance of these events for the best results.

For more information, make sure to check the calendar of events presided over by the Holy Father.


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About The Author

Stephen Pickhardt

Stephen is the CEO of Free Tours by Foot and has overseen the transformation of a local walking tour company into a global tour community and traveler’s advice platform. He has personally led thousands of group tours in the US and Europe, and is an expert in trip planning and sightseeing, with a focus on budget travelers. Stephen has been published and featured in dozens of publications including The Wall Street Journal, BBC, Yahoo, Washington.org, and more.
Updated: August 25th, 2022
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