Free Entry to St. Paul’s Cathedral

This post discusses how to visit St. Paul’s Cathedral, including tickets, discounts (including free entry), and other tips on planning your visit here.   

 

 


ST. PAUL’S CATHEDRAL TICKET PRICES

Although you can enter for free during worshiping hours, tickets will allow you to experience the entire Cathedral.

Visitors are given a multimedia guide as well as access to the Whispering, Stone and Golden Galleries, which means you can climb to the very top of the church and take in some breathtaking views!  

Be sure to inquire about skip-the-line tickets, especially during busy seasons.

Tips: Entry into St. Paul’s Cathedral is part of Smart Destination’s Explorer Pass and Build Your Own Pass. Be sure to find out how to save on popular London tourist attractions.


FREE ANNUAL PASS: 

When buying admission tickets at the gate or in advance at the online rates, you can opt-in to have your ticket valid for a year as opposed to that one day, and it’s at no additional cost.

In essence, at present, an adult could pay £16.00 online and have a whole year’s worth of sightseeing entry. 


Opening Hours for Visitors

  • Monday to Saturday 8:30– 16:00 (last entry)
  • [Please note that this can vary depending on service and event programmes]

 


Back to top


 

HOW TO GET HERE

St. Paul’s Cathedral is located within the City of London. Its central location means that you can reach it by various London Underground stations as well as bus lines.

Regardless of how you get here, we recommend using this Google Maps link for directions to the cathedral

 

Where is St. Paul's Cathedral

 

The nearest Underground station is St. Paul’s (Central line). 

The cathedral is also within walking distance from Mansion House (Circle + District lines) and Barbican (Circle, Hammersmith and City and Metropolitan lines).  

Be sure to read our tips on navigating the London Underground.

Public bus #’s: 4, 11, 15, 23, 25, 26, 100, 242 all stop at or near the cathedral.

Also, all major hop-on-hop-off bus tours make stops at the cathedral.

We also come here on several of our walking tours, including the following:

  • City of London Tour
  • Harry Potter Tour
  • World War 2 Blitz Tour

See our full schedule of tours.

 


Back to top


 

TIP FOR FREE ENTRY

As a house of worship, St. Paul’s Cathedral holds daily services. For those who wish to use the church for worship purposes, there is no fee to enter, providing guests arrive in time for the service.

New Change Building View of St. Paul'sAttending a service at St. Paul’s means you will not be allowed to explore the building, tombs, memorials, and domes. These areas are blocked off during hours of worship.

However, you will get to sit inside the church and enjoy its’ majesty, size, and beauty, all whilst taking in services steeped in centuries of historic tradition.

TIP: Be sure to also read our post on the 50+ free things to do in London for visitors.

Opening Hours for Worshipers

  • Daily Services at: 7:30, 8:00, 12:30 and 17:00*
  • Sunday Services at: 8:00, 11:00, 15:15*, 16:45, 18:00

Margaret’s Tip

The 17:00 weekday services and the 15:15 Sunday service contain the Choral Evensong.

These services are sung by boys and gentlemen’s choirs that feature some of the most enchanting, haunting and impressive church performances in the world!]

 


Back to top


 

THE BUILDING OF ST. PAUL’S

Built by our country’s most famous architect, Christopher Wren, in the Baroque style, St. Paul’s origins lie centuries ago.

There have been multiple St. Paul’s churches on the site our current St. Paul’s stands on today. Wren’s version started life shortly after the Great Fire of London burned the Medieval St. Paul’s to the ground in 1666.

Backed by King Charles II, it took Wren over 9 years just to design the church and then only around 33 years to build it (which is amazing when you consider all the modern tools and equipment Wren didn’t have!).

St. Paul’s was consecrated in 1708 and at that point, it was the tallest building in London – holding that title until 1962!  

Visit St. Paul’s website for more information on the history of the structure.

 

Tags: